The Importance of Spay/Neuter

Proactive Animal Sheltering Spay/Neuter Position:
We believe spay/neuter is VITAL to humanely reducing the dog and cat overpopulation and shelter/rescue intake.  We focus on spay/neuter and It Must Be All Three:  owned pets, community cats and shelter/rescue animals.

Beautiful Gray Cat

Best Friends Position:

The role of spay/neuter in achieving no-kill

Best Friends believes in sterilization as a method of population control for domesticated animals. With millions of animals being born every year, we believe that the only exemptions should be when it is medically inadvisable to perform the surgery and when the animals are in the care of a highly responsible breeder.

For a community to reach and sustain no-kill status, spay/neuter surgeries should be made available widely. In communities around the country, spay/neuter is an essential part of achieving sustainable lifesaving.

The Humane Society of the United States Position:

The HSUS also urges humane organizations and animal care and control agencies to require that all animals be sterilized before release for adoption, unless medically inappropriate, and to encourage the spaying and neutering of companion animals within their communities. We support the enactment and enforcement of animal control ordinances designed to regulate, deter and reduce companion animal breeding and we encourage cooperation between animal shelters and veterinarians in implementing sterilization programs and other solutions to the problem of companion animal homelessness.

ASPCA Position:

The ASPCA strongly recommends that all companion dogs and cats, except those who are part of a responsible breeder’s breeding program or where surgical sterilization is contraindicated for medical reasons, be spayed or neutered. To prevent the accidental breeding of young cats and dogs, the ASPCA supports pediatric or “early-age” spay/neuter of animals, i.e., as soon as they reach a minimum of two months of age and two pounds in weight.

Smart Dog